How crowded is crowded?

Copenhagen differs from Seoul. In Copenhagen, I have ample opportunities to feel emptiness. When I go to a shopping mall (Kronen Vanlose) at 5PM on a weekday, it is literally vacant. Only few are spotted.     In Seoul, people constantly bump into people on street. By default, I feel crowdedness. When I go to Costco Wholesale at…

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Women-only train car vs. all gender toilet

Women only subway cars are available in Shenzhen, China. They are also found in Cairo, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico city, Tokyo, Delhi, Jakarta, and Kuala Lumpur. However, priority carriages for women receive mixed reactions. According to the Wikipedia,   … Women cited safety from gropers, as well as not having to tolerate various smells. Men cited not having…

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Self service kiosks are everywhere. Where are people?

The Frankfurt airport in Germany has Nespresso Coffee kiosks. They brew coffee.     The canteen at Copenhagen Business School in Denmark has a self-checkout system. It tells how much I should pay.     The Max, a fast food restaurant in Stockholm, Sweden, has a do-it-yourself kiosk stand. It receives orders.     A hotel in Oslo, Norway,…

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Do people tip more when the tip jar looks like a human?

Henckell is my favorite cafe in Frederiksberg, Copenhagen. It is a local place with great coffee and sandwich. I feel cozy inside. It has only four small tables.     There is a tip jar next to the credit card machine on the counter table. Interestingly, it has a smiley face, two arms, and two…

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What happens when you reserve a taxi at 6am in Copenhagen?

In Copenhagen, people rarely take taxi. They ride bicycles or, if needed, take public transportation such as bus or subways. Therefore, I was not surprised when I heard that Uber’s operation was illegal. According to the news on March 28, 2017 by Alanna Petroff at CNN, “The government is passing a new law that will essentially…

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Why are trash cans angled on bike lanes?

In Copenhagen, Denmark, many people choose bicycles rather than cars. In fact, the priority on the road seems to go to bicycle riders than pedestrians. Therefore, Danes often have more three bicycles; one for commuting between home and train station, another for commuting between train station and workplace, and the other for enjoying weekend. Some trash cans…

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